Hawken Blog

Wiltshire river #beautiful_world

Wiltshire river #beautiful_world

Sunshine at last

Sunshine at last

Manhattan

Manhattan

nbcnightlynews:

Behind the scenes: Inside the control room for #NBCNightlyNews

nbcnightlynews:

Behind the scenes: Inside the control room for #NBCNightlyNews

theatlantic:

The Frog That Got Caught In the Crossfire of a Rocket Launch

On Friday evening, NASA’s Minotaur V rocket blasted off from its launchpad at a spaceport in Virginia, carrying the LADEE spacecraft on the first leg of its trip from Earth to the moon. The scene that resulted was fiery. It was inspiring. It was epic. 
It was also, however, not without its casualties. 
The picture above, captured on Friday by one of the remote cameras NASA had set up for the big launch, captured a creature that found itself, alas, caught in the crossfire of humanity’s drive to explore: a frog. A very unfortunate frog. Launch pads, you see, are generally built near marshes and ponds whose water can absorb the flames of a rocket’s ignition. And this little guy was in the wrong place at the very, very wrong time. 
Read more. [Image: NASA/Wallops/Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport]

theatlantic:

The Frog That Got Caught In the Crossfire of a Rocket Launch

On Friday evening, NASA’s Minotaur V rocket blasted off from its launchpad at a spaceport in Virginia, carrying the LADEE spacecraft on the first leg of its trip from Earth to the moon. The scene that resulted was fiery. It was inspiring. It was epic. 

It was also, however, not without its casualties. 

The picture above, captured on Friday by one of the remote cameras NASA had set up for the big launch, captured a creature that found itself, alas, caught in the crossfire of humanity’s drive to explore: a frog. A very unfortunate frog. Launch pads, you see, are generally built near marshes and ponds whose water can absorb the flames of a rocket’s ignition. And this little guy was in the wrong place at the very, very wrong time.

Read more. [Image: NASA/Wallops/Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport]

theatlantic:

The Hidden World of the Typewriter

The typewriter is, among things, an archetype of today’s computers. But while computers are increasingly products of our disposable consumer culture — assumed and built to be upgraded often — typewriters were built to last. While occasionally some innovation or another would pop up – a machine made noiseless or self-correcting or electric – the general idea remained the same. Fingers mashed down a key, the key drove a lever with the designated character on it toward an ink-saturated ribbon, and with a decisive clack the intended mark was made (provided the typist’s fingers were accurate). It was a physical interpretation of intention-meets-action, thought-meets-paper, and many users maintained an ongoing relationship with their typewriters for years.

So intense was this relationship between writers and their machines, that many people who made their careers out of writing never made the transition to computers; Hunter S. Thompson used a typewriter until his until his death in 2005. And Cormac McCarthy is still click-clacking away, after selling his Lettera 32, which he’d been writing on for close to 50 years, at a charity auction a few years back for $254,500 – and promptly receiving another of the same model from a friend for $20. It’s unsurprising that he’d stay committed to the heavy, clunky producer of words. Computers and other digital tools may have brought ease to writing; they don’t offer, however, the deliberation that typewriters do — the forethought required to avoid the particular punishment of a typer: a piece of correction ribbon or dab of White Out be required to eradicate an erroneous mark or misplaced musing.
Read more. [Image: James Joiner]

theatlantic:

The Hidden World of the Typewriter

The typewriter is, among things, an archetype of today’s computers. But while computers are increasingly products of our disposable consumer culture — assumed and built to be upgraded often — typewriters were built to last. While occasionally some innovation or another would pop up – a machine made noiseless or self-correcting or electric – the general idea remained the same. Fingers mashed down a key, the key drove a lever with the designated character on it toward an ink-saturated ribbon, and with a decisive clack the intended mark was made (provided the typist’s fingers were accurate). It was a physical interpretation of intention-meets-action, thought-meets-paper, and many users maintained an ongoing relationship with their typewriters for years.

So intense was this relationship between writers and their machines, that many people who made their careers out of writing never made the transition to computers; Hunter S. Thompson used a typewriter until his until his death in 2005. And Cormac McCarthy is still click-clacking away, after selling his Lettera 32, which he’d been writing on for close to 50 years, at a charity auction a few years back for $254,500 – and promptly receiving another of the same model from a friend for $20. It’s unsurprising that he’d stay committed to the heavy, clunky producer of words. Computers and other digital tools may have brought ease to writing; they don’t offer, however, the deliberation that typewriters do — the forethought required to avoid the particular punishment of a typer: a piece of correction ribbon or dab of White Out be required to eradicate an erroneous mark or misplaced musing.

Read more. [Image: James Joiner]